Dealing with Anger…

ANGER MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUE #1 – RECOGNIZE STRESS

This anger control  tool emphasizes the importance of understanding how stress underlies anger and how to reduce stress before it turns into anger. Stress can be in many forms, stress from being involved in to many activities at school, feeling over-loaded with homework & chore responsibilities, relationship issues with friends, family……built up stress can erupt when you least expect it…learning how to recognize when your at your limit is important.

#2 – DEVELOP EMPATHY

Empathy is when you can learn to understand & see things from the perspective of others – “putting yourself in their shoes”

#3 – RESPOND INSTEAD OF REACT

Each of us has the capacity to choose how we express our anger and can learn new ways to say what we need. Responding without reacting in anger or in a rage will help you to respond in a more positive way.

#4 – CHANGE THAT CONVERSATION WITH YOURSELF….

How you “talk to yourself” can actually make you more angry…..for example…self defeating talk like…”I never do anything right” or “nothing ever turns out right” ….learning how to change that  “self-talk”  empowers you to deal with anger better….and have self-control.

#5 – COMMUNICATE ASSERTIVELY

Learning how to say what you need and learning how to respond without getting angry or hostile is being assertive.

#6 – ADJUST EXPECTATIONS

Anger is often triggered because what we espect and what we get are not always the same…learning how to adjust your expectations  and being willing to compromise to work out the problem can help you cope with a difficult situation with people or even with yourself.

#7- DON’T FORGET

Resentment or hanging onto your “bag of anger” is a form of anger that does more damage to the holder than the offender.  Making a decision to “let go” (while protecting ourselves) is often a process of forgiveness – or at least acceptance-and a major step toward anger control.

#8 – RETREAT AND THINK THINGS OVER

This anger management tool consists of removing yourself from the situation and taking a temporary “time-out” while giving yourself time to cool off and re-evaluate your situation and decide if it is worth staying angry.

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michelle.grush@district6.org (541) 494-6343